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Welcome to Kavvanotes

May 16, 2010

Hello friends! Welcome to Kavvanotes, my new blog.

Kavvanah is the Hebrew word for intention, the thoughts that company the words of our prayers. In the symbols of Jewish tradition, the words in our mouth is the body of the prayer, while our thoughts are its soul. The words of the prayer, the structure of the service and all the details of the liturgy are called “keva.”

Rabbi Arnold Wolf describes the dynamic between the two parts of prayer:

Thus, Jewish prayer is guided by two opposite principles: order and outburst, regularity and spontaneity, uniformity and individuality, law and freedom, a duty and a prerogative, empathy and self-expression, insight and sensitivity, creed and faith, the word and that which is beyond words. These principles are two poles about which Jewish prayer revolves. Since each of the two moves in the opposite direction, equilibrium can only be maintained if both are of equal force. However, the pole of regularity usually proves to be stronger than the pole of spontaneity and as a result, there is a perpetual danger of prayer becoming a mere habit, a mechanical performance, an exercise in repetitiousness.

Here in this blog, I will offer some notes about my intentions, observations from my spiritual search and work as a cantorial soloist. And the intersection of technology and the spirit.

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One Comment leave one →
  1. Eli Glazer permalink
    June 10, 2010 1:37 PM

    David, What a treat to be made aware of these new channels for accessing the ancient text! Thanks for taking the time to make it known.

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